Seth Godin explains why our organizations find it hard to change.

“We don’t need to make it better”  by  Seth Godin (February 5, 2013)

Improvement comes with many costs.

It costs time and money to make something better. It’s risky, as well, because trying to make something better might make it worse. Perhaps making it better for the masses makes it worse for the people who already like it. And risk brings fear, because that means someone is going to be held responsible, and so the lizard brain wants out.

Which is why, unless there’s an urgent reason to make something better right now, most organizations naturally don’t volunteer to improve.

Operating systems, government programs, established non-profits, teachers with tenure, market leaders, businesses with long-standing customers–these organizations are all facing an uphill battle in creating a culture where there’s an urgency to improve.

Just because it’s uphill doesn’t mean it’s hopeless, though. One of the most essential tasks a leader faces is understanding just how much the team is afraid of making things better (because it usually means making things worse–for some people).

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Thank you, Seth!

Your last line is my favorite:  “One of the most essential tasks a leader faces is understanding just how much the team is afraid of making things better (because it usually means making things worse–for some people).”

Coaching helps leaders and their teams move past hopeless into hope.

Individuals too.

Coaching compels the coachee to take the risk and make the change even though it’s painful  because they have a coach who is going to ask them how they are doing and what progress they are making.

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